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Krys' Quick Blog Post -
mLearnCon Conference, San Jose Calafornia.

I wanted to share out some pictures on the event and will be posting more information and links after our sharing out with our ISC Ohana.

General Welcome, Main Ballroom. Over 875 folks in attendance. The conference kicked off with high energy. The event was well organized with a lot of amazing overlapping breakout sessions.
Vendors and experts from all around the globe talk about integrating mobile learning
on the iDevices and tablets with a focus of compatability for technology and learning. Many discussions about taking advantage of the "hands-on" experience on a mobile device and how this experience adds value to learning.

Very excited to actualy speak face to face with the experts of Lectora! In addition, we were able to talk story with the faces behind BlackBoard Mobile, Centurion, Cisco, and a wealth of other leading mobile developers and programming experts that create or support mobile learning modules.

The next pictures are what we explored on our down-time after the conference was over.
2nd Apple Store, Palo Alto CA.

Mission Tower, Stanford University


Mission Tower, Stanford University

View from Mission Tower, Stanford University

View from Mission Tower, Stanford University

The Bells at Mission Tower, Stanford University

Pictures do not show the extremely large space
very well, this hall way appears to go forever.
Main Quadrangle, Stanford University

Chapel, Main Quadrangle, Standford University

Chapel, Main Quadrangle, Standford University

Chapel, Main Quadrangle, Standford University

Chapel, Main Quadrangle, Standford University

Sculptural Fountain, Campus Center, Stanford University

Going Home! Airport Gate, San Jose California

Interactive Aquarium. The TV monitors are submerged in the
water and video cameras bring you inside the
aquarium. Your movements
dictate the changing
video simulations.
San Jose Airport

This photo talks more about the aquarium shown in the last photo.

First time on a propeller plain! Quite a nice flight actually.


Night Shot of the moon over the Pacific, Between Portland OR, and Honolulu International.


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